Japan: How To Make a Paper Crane (Origami)

About Origami

Origami is the art of paper folding: the name is constructed from the two Japanese words ‘ori’ (meaning fold) and ‘gami’ (meaning paper). Paper folding in ancient Japan was for ceremonial purposes only, but by the Edo period (1603-1868), as paper became more affordable through mass production, paper folding also became recreational.

*Check back here between September 25 to October 25 for a full instructional video!

Supplies

1 15x15cm square sheet of paper

Instructions

Step 1
Take one sheet of paper with colour or design side up. Fold it on the diagonal to form a triangle. Unfold it and fold it across the other diagonal to form a triangle.

Step 2
With the folded side facing to the left and the open end of the triangle facing to the right, take the bottom end of the triangle and fold it over on the crease line to meet the opposite end at the top.

Step 3
Open the top folded section and bring the point down to the bottom point. Follow the crease lines. A diamond shape is created with the bottom piece extended.

Step 4
Flip it over keeping the open end of the diamond facing down. Open up the extended piece and take the top point and fold it over following the crease lines and then down to the open-ended bottom point.

Step 5
Take the left side of the diamond and fold it to the middle with the left side edge following the centerline of the diamond. Unfold it. Take the right side of the top layer of the diamond and fold it to the middle with the right side edge following the centerline of the diamond. Unfold it. Fold the top point down to create the top crease line. Unfold it.

Step 6
Take the bottom point of the diamond. Lift the top layer up and move it to the top point of the diamond. Stretch out the sides, following the crease lines. Follow the crease line from the previous step. Push the left and right sides together so the edges meet in the center.

Step 7
Flip it over so the fold is on the bottom and extends to the top. Repeat steps 6 to 8, creating another fold.

Step 8
Take the bottom left edge and fold it to the middle following the centerline. Take the bottom-right edge and fold it to the middle following the centerline. The folds you make result in the kite shape.

Step 9
Flip it over and repeat step 11 to create the same kite shape. Push the bottom left piece up between the top and bottom sections keeping the angular shape. This will be the tail of the crane.

Step 10
Push the bottom right piece up between the top and bottom sections keeping the angular shape. Take the tip of one of the angular pieces and fold it down, creating a beak. This will be the head of the crane.

Step 11
Gently pull both wings out to the sides and the crane’s body will puff out.

Be sure to post your craft results on social media using the hashtag #SurreyFusion and tag @surreybcevents.

 

About Japan

Japan is an island nation in the Pacific Ocean with dense cities, imperial palaces, mountainous national parks and thousands of shrines and temples. Shinkansen bullet trains connect the main islands of Kyushu (with Okinawa's subtropical beaches), Honshu (home to Tokyo and Hiroshima’s atomic-bomb memorial) and Hokkaido (famous for skiing). Tokyo, the capital, is known for skyscrapers, shopping and pop culture.

Culture

Japanese culture has evolved greatly from its origins. Contemporary culture combines influences from Asia, Europe and North America. Traditional Japanese arts include crafts such as ceramics, textiles, lacquerware, swords and dolls; performances of bunraku, kabuki, noh, dance, and rakugo; and other practices, the tea ceremony, ikebana, martial arts, calligraphy, origami, onsen, Geisha and games.

Food

Japanese cuisine is based on combining staple foods, typically Japanese rice or noodles, with a soup and okazu—dishes made from fish, vegetable, tofu and the like—to add flavor to the staple food. In the early modern era ingredients such as red meats that had previously not been widely used in Japan were introduced. Japanese cuisine is known for its emphasis on seasonality of food, quality of ingredients and presentation. Japanese cuisine offers a vast array of regional specialties that use traditional recipes and local ingredients.

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PRODUCED BY
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